Archive for the ‘international commercial litigation’ Category

Two-Year Limitation Period Applies to Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Ontario

January 19, 2017

The Court of Appeal for Ontario has confirmed that the 2-year limitation period under the Limitations Act, 2002 applies to enforcement of foreign judgments. The limitation period begins to run the earlier of when the time to appeal the foreign judgment has expired or, if an appeal is taken, the date of the appeal decision, rendering the decision as final. The limitation period may be longer if the claim was not “discovered” within the meaning of s. 5 of the Limitations Act, 2002, after the date of the appeal decision: Independence Plaza 1 Associates, L.L.C. v. Figliolini, 2017 ONCA 44 (CanLII), http://canlii.ca/t/gwxmx

I have previously argued that no limitation period should apply where the defendant judgment debtor was not resident in Ontario when the original action was commenced in the foreign jurisdiction, even if moving or returning to Ontario in this paper: Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Canada (January 15, 2014). Ontario Bar Association Institute 2014, ‘Internationalizing Commercial Contracts’. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2379721

2014 Canadian International Law Students Conference

January 28, 2014

CILSC

I am privileged to be the keynote speaker at the upcoming  2014 Canadian International Law Students Conference, jointly presented by the International Law Society of University of Toronto Faculty of Law and Osgoode Hall Law School on Saturday, 1 February 2014 from 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM (EST). Here are the event details:

Event Details

The CILSC provides a forum for law students, academics, practitioners, and leaders in the field to exchange ideas about Canada’s international and domestic performance in public and private international law. Speakers will also touch on how to begin exploring a career in this field. For speaker bios visit www.cilsc.com

The conference has a history of attracting prominent speakers involved in the practice and study of international law. This year we are featuring speakers across five panels:

Panel 1: Litigating Foreign Cases in Canadian Courts
Panel 2: International Intellectual Property Law
Panel 3: Careers in Public International Law
Panel 4: Careers in Private International Law
Panel 5: Law and the Syrian Crisis

Schedule:

9:30-9:45 Introductions
9:45-11:00: Substantive panel 1 (Public)
11:15-12:30: Substantive panel 2 (Private)
12:30-1:30: Lunch
1:30-2:30: Concurrent Career Panels
2:45-4:00 Substantive Panel (Syria)
4:00-5:30 Reception

Ticket Information:

Online Student Ticket: $12.00

In-person Student Ticket: $10.00

For in-person tickets, Osgoode students please contact cassandrastefanucci@osgoode.yorku.ca; U of T students please contact james.rendell@mail.utoronto.ca or ws.wu@mail.utoronto.ca. These tickets will be available at the door.

Professional Tickets: $75.00

Current members of the bar who attend the conference are eligible for up to 3.75 hours of CPD credits. We will provide holders of Professional Tickets materials to be submitted to the law society for CPD credits.

If you’re interested in a career in international law or want to hear about the latest international law developments from leading academics and practitioners , this is a must-attend program.

Ontario Court Assumes Jurisdiction Over Foreign Issuer in Securities Class Action

October 24, 2013

In Kaynes v. BP, 2013 ONSC 5802 (CanLII), (“Kaynes“), Mr. Kaynes, the plaintiff, commenced a proposed class action against BP, the well-known multinational oil and gas company, headquartered in the United Kingdom and registered on the London, New York and Toronto Stock Exchanges.  Kaynes alleged that BP made various misrepresentations in its investor documents before and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010 (the “Oil Spill”).  He sought leave to bring a statutory action for secondary market misrepresentation under Part XXIII.I of the Securities Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. S.5, and an alternative claim for common law negligent misrepresentation.

 A parallel class action was commenced in the United States (In BP plc Securities Litigation,  United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Case No. 4:10-md-02185) brought on behalf of a proposed class consisting of all purchasers of ADS over the NYSE between November 8, 2007 and May 28, 2010. Kaynes seeks to represent a class of Canadian residents who purchased BP shares between May 9, 2007 and May 28, 2010 and includes all Canadians who purchased common shares and ADS, whether on the TSX, NYSE or European exchanges;  excluding any Canadian residents who purchased BP shares over the NYSE and who do not opt-out of the U.S. Proceeding.

BP brought a jurisdiction motion in advance of the leave and certification motions, seeking an order staying this proceeding (in part) based on lack of subject-matter jurisdiction, or, alternatively, on the basis of forum non conveniens.
(more…)

Why Lawyers Should Always Read the Footnotes in Judgments

June 12, 2013

The decision of Justice Newbould in Re Ghana Gold Corporation2013 ONSC 3284 (Ont. SCJ) [“Ghana Gold”] is an important reminder to always the read the footnotes in judgments. (more…)

Tanya J. Monestier, “(Still) a ‘Real and Substantial’ Mess: The Law of Jurisdiction in Canada”

May 10, 2013

Tanya J. Monestier (Roger Williams University School of Law) has published “(Still) a ‘Real and Substantial’ Mess: The Law of Jurisdiction in Canada”, Fordham International Law Journal, Vol. 36, p. 397, 2013/Roger Williams Univ. Legal Studies Paper No. 136. The abstract reads:

In April 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada released the most important decision on personal jurisdiction in over twenty years. The Van Breda decision was intended to clarify, once and for all, the application of the “real and substantial connection” test to ex juris defendants. The Supreme Court in Van Breda adopted an approach to the real and substantial connection test that relied on the plaintiff fitting himself within one of four presumptive factors in order to establish jurisdiction: (a) The defendant is domiciled or resident in the province; (b) The defendant carries on business in the province; (c) The tort was committed in the province; (d) A contract connected with the dispute was made in the province. The Court also left open the possibility of creating additional presumptive factors in the future. The presumptive factors approach was intended to re-orient the jurisdictional test toward objective factual connections between the forum and the cause of action and to establish a simple and predictable framework for courts to use in making jurisdictional determinations. In this Article, I comprehensively examine the new presumptive factors approach to jurisdiction adopted by the Supreme Court in Van Breda with a view to exposing its shortcomings. I argue that this approach to jurisdiction – while simple and predictable on its face – will actually complicate jurisdictional determinations for the foreseeable future. Litigants will try to find creative ways to fit themselves within one of these four factors. And courts will spend years unpacking and defining the contours of the four presumptive factors. I also argue that the Court in Van Breda failed to provide meaningful guidance on how all pieces of the jurisdictional puzzle fit together. Among the outstanding questions: How does the real and substantial connection test work in non-tort cases? How do the traditional jurisdictional bases of consent and presence fit into the jurisdictional mix? Can the forum of necessity doctrine be reconciled with the real and substantial connection test? How does the test apply to the enforcement of foreign judgments? The Court simply left these hard questions until later. In short, while the Court in Van Breda was on the right track, it got derailed – which may ultimately mean another twenty years until the outstanding jurisdictional issues are sorted out.

Download a copy of the article at SSRN here.


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