Archive for the ‘enforcement’ Category

My New Paper: “Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Canada”

January 16, 2014

I’ll be speaking at the upcoming Ontario Bar Association Institute 2014, “Internationalizing Commercial Contracts” program and have prepared a paper entitled “Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Canada”. Here’s the abstract:

This paper provides an overview of the governing conflict of laws principles for the recognition or enforcement of foreign judgments, including an analysis of the recent Court of Appeal for Ontario decision in Yaiguaje et al. v. Chevron Corporation et al. and its implications for the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments, generally. The issue of state immunity as an obstacle to foreign judgment enforcement is also considered.

A copy of the paper is available on SSRN here.

Tanya J. Monestier, “Jurisdiction and the Enforcement of Foreign Judgments”

January 16, 2014

Tanya J. Monestier (Roger Williams University School of Law) has published “Jurisdiction and the Enforcement of Foreign Judgments”, The Advocates’ Quarterly, Vol. 42, p. 107, 2013/ Roger Williams Univ. Legal Studies Paper No. 143. Here’s the abstract:

In April 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada released its decision in what has become the pivotal case on personal jurisdiction in Canada, Van Breda v. Club Resorts Ltd. In Van Breda, the Court laid out a new framework for, and defined more precisely the content of, the “real and substantial connection” test that governs the assertion of jurisdiction over ex juris defendants. Specifically, the Court created four presumptive connecting factors that courts are to use in jurisdictional determinations. The presumptive connecting factors approach to jurisdiction was intended to increase certainty and predictability in jurisdictional determinations.

One issue that was alluded to, but ultimately left unanswered, by the Supreme Court in Van Breda was what effect the new presumptive factors framework for the real and substantial connection test had on the enforcement of judgments. Since the Supreme Court’s seminal decision in Morguard Investments Ltd. v. De Savoye in 1990, it is well established law that the real and substantial connection test for jurisdiction simpliciter is intended to be “correlated” with the real and substantial connection test used as a predicate for enforcing foreign judgments. Does this mean that courts are now supposed to use the new Van Breda framework for jurisdiction simpliciter in the judgment enforcement context? This article argues that the real and substantial connection framework established by the Court in Van Breda for jurisdiction simpliciter should not be exported outside of the particular context in which it was developed. The Van Breda approach to jurisdiction simpliciter, although seemingly straightforward, is actually a blunt tool for assessing jurisdiction – and any concerns with its application would only be magnified if applied to the enforcement of foreign judgments.

A copy of the article is available at SSRN here.

Ontario appeal court allows appeal, lifts stay in Yaiguaje v. Chevron Corp.

December 17, 2013

Chevron Corporation

The Court of Appeal for Ontario has just released its judgment in Yaiguaje v. Chevron Corporation, 2013 ONCA 758; (“Yaiguaje“) a significant conflict of laws decision which will have major repercussions beyond cross-border and international litigation.

For a backgrounder, see Alejandro Manevich’s guest post: Lago Agrio comes to Ontario: Chevron and the $19B judgment and also my guest posts: The Motions to Dismiss inYaiguaje, and Comments on the Lago Agrio Plaintiffs Enforcement Action in Canada over at Ted Folkman’s Letters Blogatory.

(more…)

Foreign judgments not subject to limitation periods, Ontario Court rules

October 2, 2013
Salvador Dali, Melting Clock

Salvador Dali, Melting Clock

In a ground-breaking decision, Mr. Justice Newbould in PT ATPK Resources TBK (Indonesia) v. Diversified Energy and Resource Corporation et al., 2013 ONSC 5913 (Ont. S.C.J.-Commercial List) (“ATPK”) held that truly foreign judgments (i.e. non-inter-provincial judgments or U.K. judgments subject to the Reciprocal Enforcement of Judgments (U.K.) Act,  RSO 1990, c R.6 (as am.) (REJUKA)) are not subject to any limitation period for recognition and enforcement purposes.

In ATPK, the applicant, PT ATPK RESOURCES TBK (Indonesia) (“ATPK”) applied for “registration” and enforcement against Hopaco Properties Limited (“Hopaco”) of two judgments of the High Court of the Republic of Singapore. Of course, “registration” is a misnomer, since Canada and Singapore have not entered into any bi-lateral enforcement treaty, such that recognition or enforcement is governed under traditional Canadian conflict of laws principles. (more…)

Manuel A. Gomez, “The Global Chase: Seeking the Recognition and Enforcement of the Lago Agrio Judgment Outside of Ecuador”

August 14, 2013

 Manuel A. Gomez (Florida International University (FIU) – College of Law) has posted “The Global Chase: Seeking the Recognition and Enforcement of the Lago Agrio Judgment Outside of Ecuador”, Stanford Journal of Complex Litigation, Vol. 1, No. 199, 2013/Florida International University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 13-14. The abstract reads:

 The Lago Agrio judgment is by all measures the largest and most complex award rendered against a multinational oil company in Ecuador, and perhaps in the entire region. With regard to its size, the type of remedies awarded to the plaintiffs by the Sucumbíos court, and the mechanisms through which those remedies will be made effective, the enforcement of the Lago Agrio judgment has rekindled a debate on several important issues that pertain to the litigation of complex cases in South America. The Lago Agrio judgment has revealed the complexity of the multi-layered, multi-step process of enforcing a foreign judgment across different jurisdictions. In so doing, the Lago Agrio ruling has a direct bearing on the larger debate about the judicial protection of collective rights in Latin America, the controversial treatment of punitive damages in countries of the civil law tradition, and the undue influence of litigants on the performance of the courts. The development of the Chevron-Ecuador litigation in South America is one of the most important pieces in the context of this saga and has been generally neglected from the consideration of academicians. This Article fills that gap.

By switching its attention away from the litigation handled by U.S. courts, and focusing into the generally overlooked South American court cases, this Article helps to complete the puzzle of the Chevron saga with regard to the factors that affect the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in that region. More specifically, this Article will discuss the interplay between the procedural steps routinely required by the national laws of the enforcing jurisdictions, the treaty obligations assumed by the nations involved, the statutory defenses allowed to the parties, and the litigation strategies employed by counsel to effectively assist or impede the judgment from being fulfilled. The contribution of this Article is two-fold. First, it discusses with certain level of detail the recognition and enforcement regime of foreign judgments across Latin America with special attention to the domestic and the international legal regimes applicable to Argentina and Brazil. Second, by giving importance to the context within which the Lago Agrio litigation and related proceedings are taking place, this Article addresses defendant’s strategies to evade the enforcement of an adverse judgment, and the incentives and challenges faced by plaintiffs, including the strategies procedural and otherwise, to obtain the recognition and enforcement of said foreign judgment. Although the discussion offered in this Article in centered on a single case, in a broader sense this Article highlights the practical difficulties of transnational judgment enforcement and the strategies employed by the parties across multiple countries.

 Download a pdf copy of the paper via SSRN here.


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